ADHD strength

Focus What You Do Well

For those of us with ADHD, it can be so easy to focus on our struggles, or on the things we can’t do well and should be able to do. It’s what so many people tend to focus on, whether it’s us or those around us. We are aware of our struggles. We will often hear people talk about it and have to hear their criticisms.

It is a challenge for ADHDers. Especially when we know our struggles and still expect ourselves to do the same as others, who don’t necessarily have ADHD. We may try to hold ourselves to neurotypical standards, because often times, that’s what we’re expected to do. At least, that’s the way it seems to us, rightly or wrongly.

Here’s the thing. As much as we struggle, we are also able to do some things well also. And it’s also not realistic to hold ourselves to neurotypical standards, because our brains are wired and work different than the neurotypical brain.

For those who are neurodiverse, cut yourself some slack.

We are human, we are neurodiverse, and everyone struggles with something, neurodiverse or not.

Instead of focusing on what you struggle, spend a little time every day, thinking about what you do well. It may not always be easy, but I’m sure there has to be something. We have strengths, just like we have weaknesses.

People with ADHD tend to be:

  • Creative
  • Compassionate towards others
  • Perseverant
  • Hyperfocus
  • Problem-solving

This is just a short list, and not all ADHDers have the same strengths or positive traits that come with ADHD, but these are just examples.

Take some time. Think about what your strengths are. Think about the good things that you are able to do. Could be almost anything. Even if it’s only one thing, that’s a good place to start.

At the end of the day, it doesn’t help anyone to just focus on the bad. If we look carefully enough, I’m sure that we can find something good. Even it’s hard to find.

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